Posts in Category: Architecture

Lord of the Manor

This shot was taken at Kings Weston House in Bristol. Kings Weston House is a grade 1 listed building and was completer in 1917 and was designed by Sir John Vanbrugh and was the home of Edward Southwell. During World War 1 the house was converted to a hospital. In 1935 the house was bought by the Bristol Municipal Charities and leased to the education authorities to be used a s a school. It went on to be Bristol Technical College of Architecture which later went on to be Bath University School for Architecture. During the following years the house was used for a verity of functions including a police training centre. The house is now used for conferences, weddings and private events, there is also a cafe which is open to the public and lovely walks around the surrounding estate.

Clifton Suspension Bridge

This is a photo of the famous Clifton Suspension Bridge, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, which sits across the Avon Gorge.The bridge spans 214 meters and is supported by two 26 meter high towers. At high tide, the bridge sits at 76 meters above the water. The bridge opened in 1864 and links Clifton to Leigh woods in North Somerset.

Clifton Observatory

Dating back to 1766 the Clifton Observatory, which sits on top of the Avon Gorge, gives fantastic views of the suspension bridge and the surrounding ares. The observatory was originally a windmill that was used to grind corn but was later adapted to grind snuff; the Observatory then became known as Snuff Mill.

In 1777 the mill caught fire, this was caused by the sails being left to turn during a gale and the equipment overheating. The mill was then left derelict for about 50 years until a Bristol based artist, William West, rented it for his studio in 1828. William West was responsible for transforming the building into what we see today, he installed a large telescope on top of the mill turning into an observatory. In 1829 the telescope was replaced by convex lens and sloping mirror which is known as the camera obscura; this still works today. Light travels through the lens and is reflected vertically down by the mirror onto a table which gives a true image of the surrounding area.

William west also built a cave below the observatory which leads to a viewing platform in the cliff face about 250 feet above the base of the Gorge. The cave, known as Giant’s cave was opened to the public in 1837 and is still accessible today.

Pero’s Bridge

This is a shot looking towards Millennium Square from Pero’s Bridge in Bristol City Centre. The big wheel is only there for a short time and I was able to frame it between the two horns of the bridge. This was taken at pedestrian rush hour but the long exposure has rendered almost all of the people invisible.

Bristol Night Lights

This is a photo taken from a recent photo walk with Frui and professional photographer Jimmy Watkins, www.jimmyimage.co.uk. There was a group of six of us and we met at Zero Degrees; our first stop was at the top of a multi-story car park which gave a great view towards the city centre. After some coaching and a few shots it was on to our next location which was at the bottom of Park Street where there were plenty of images to be had if you looked for them. It was a great experience and an enjoyable evening spending time with other photographers.

 

Flying High

Hello world!

SS Great Britain

I set the alarm for an early morning stroll in the hope of catching a sunrise. There were plenty of clouds around which made for a dramatic sky but the sun was not going to play ball. I used a tripod for stability and an ND grad to balance the exposure of the sky. This shot was taken at 17mm at f11 and using hyperfocal focusing. Using the hyperfocal point of the lens is something that I have not really used before, although I have heard of it, so I thought it was about time to give it a go. There is a formula for working out the hyperfocal distance which is…hyperfocal distance = (focal length x focal length) / (circle of confusion x f-stop)

The circle of confusion is commonly 0.02 for a full frame dSLR and 0.03 for a 1.6 corp sensor typically found on a canon crop dSLR. Anyway, I didn’t sit down and work out my hyperfocal point for this photograph; I simply downloaded a free Android app called hyperfocal pro. This took away all of the pain of the math and let me enjoy my photography! By the way, if you want to read up about the circle of confusion there is plenty about it on the internet but it is quite technical and at times, confusing!

Millennium Square

This is Millennium Square in Bristol; the sun was shining through a gap in the clouds which bought out the warmth and colours of the square against a cool moody sky.

Second Severn Crossing

Here is another photo of the Severn Bridge but this time in black and white. I think that black and white does suit some photos more than others and I think this is one that falls into that camp. I know that some people are pulled to either colour or mono images but I like both equally. I don’t have any secret recipe when it comes to editing black and white images. I do though have a basic workflow which I follow to begin with then I go with my feeling of how the image should look. Please feel free to leave any comments.

What do you prefer, Colour or Black and White?

Severn Bridge

I decided to go for a drive to Severn Beach to get some photos of the Severn Crossing. It was not quite the sunset of the previous days but I didn’t let that put me off. I did have black and white in mind but thought the colour version was good. It kind of feels monochromatic and I particularly like the texture in the foreground against the smooth sweeping line of the bridge.