Posts Tagged: Black and White

Ain’t No Smoke Without Fire

Another photo from the 1940’s shoot, I was trying to capture that time when the troops had a visit from a glamorous star such as Marilyn Monroe. As this was an open event it wasn’t easy to try and capture the scenes but it was a lot of fun trying. The two soldiers had bought their world war ll collection of memorabilia which included armoured cars that has been restored to their former glory.

Colour Pop

I wanted to have a practice balancing flash and ambient light so I thought I would try and make a photo of an old neglected shed at the top of my garden. The aim was to get a good exposure for the light outside of the shed and add flash for the inside exposure. I was thinking black and white before I took the shot as I wanted to make use of the textures. After converting to mono in Photoshop I found that the ivy had got lost so the idea of a colour pop sprang to mind. I rarely do colour pop but I thought it worked well in this image.

What are your thoughts? Do you like colour pop photos, is this something you already do or does it have the same effect on you as over cooked HDR has on me (I’m not a big fan!)?

SS Great Britain

I set the alarm for an early morning stroll in the hope of catching a sunrise. There were plenty of clouds around which made for a dramatic sky but the sun was not going to play ball. I used a tripod for stability and an ND grad to balance the exposure of the sky. This shot was taken at 17mm at f11 and using hyperfocal focusing. Using the hyperfocal point of the lens is something that I have not really used before, although I have heard of it, so I thought it was about time to give it a go. There is a formula for working out the hyperfocal distance which is…hyperfocal distance = (focal length x focal length) / (circle of confusion x f-stop)

The circle of confusion is commonly 0.02 for a full frame dSLR and 0.03 for a 1.6 corp sensor typically found on a canon crop dSLR. Anyway, I didn’t sit down and work out my hyperfocal point for this photograph; I simply downloaded a free Android app called hyperfocal pro. This took away all of the pain of the math and let me enjoy my photography! By the way, if you want to read up about the circle of confusion there is plenty about it on the internet but it is quite technical and at times, confusing!