Posts Tagged: BS3 Photography

Witch and the Black Rose

This photo is from a themed shoot with model Helen Morgan Rogers and Mad Hatter Makeup Artist. It was taken in a wooded area at around midday so I had to get a bit creative with the lighting. Two speedlights and a shoot through umbrella were used to create this shot. Makeup was done on location and we had a few bemused looks as we walked a short distance to a clearing, complete with pumpkins, wands and other witch articals to where the shoot took place. The wood is very popular with plenty of trails and cycle routs and at one point there were some very excited children telling their mum that there was a real witch in the woods!The shoot was great fun and a huge thank you to Helen and Mad Hatter Makeup.

Ain’t No Smoke Without Fire

Another photo from the 1940’s shoot, I was trying to capture that time when the troops had a visit from a glamorous star such as Marilyn Monroe. As this was an open event it wasn’t easy to try and capture the scenes but it was a lot of fun trying. The two soldiers had bought their world war ll collection of memorabilia which included armoured cars that has been restored to their former glory.

Portrait of a Red Head

This was taken at a rocky beach bear Bristol, I like the colours of the models hair and the scarf that is flowing around her arm. Taken with a Canon 6d and a Canon 85 mm f/1.8 lens. Zoom lenses can be convenient but I do like to use prime lenses, they get you to think about what you are doing, have a nice shallow depth of field and make you use your feet instead if just standing there and using the zoom to frame.By using your feet, you can discover new angles which you may of otherwise missed.

Lord of the Manor

This shot was taken at Kings Weston House in Bristol. Kings Weston House is a grade 1 listed building and was completer in 1917 and was designed by Sir John Vanbrugh and was the home of Edward Southwell. During World War 1 the house was converted to a hospital. In 1935 the house was bought by the Bristol Municipal Charities and leased to the education authorities to be used a s a school. It went on to be Bristol Technical College of Architecture which later went on to be Bath University School for Architecture. During the following years the house was used for a verity of functions including a police training centre. The house is now used for conferences, weddings and private events, there is also a cafe which is open to the public and lovely walks around the surrounding estate.

Sadness

This photo was taken during a rehearsal of a dance show that was held at Churchill Academy and Sixth Form near Bristol UK. The dancers of Danceblast did eight performances over seven days during the Easter holidays. The dancers ages range from 4 to 18 and the show featured a live band. This was quite a challenging environment to try and photograph as you are at the mercy of the stage lighting so you have to use what you have got to your advantage. Coupled with the lighting is the need for high ISO and a quick reaction to try and capture the moment. I did not want to use flash as that would have killed the atmosphere.

Daffodil

The days are beginning to get longer and the spring flowers are starting to appear . I have a Sigma 105 mm macro lens which I haven’t really used much so I thought I would have a play. This shot was taken on a tabletop with a mottled brown paper backdrop. I used a large octabox, fitted with a grid, camera right and a foam core board as a reflector. The light was provided by two cheap Aperlite speedlights, one in the softbox and one with a Rogue Flashbender grid on the background. I set a custom white balance in camera and did some basic processing on the resulting RAW file. The vignette was created by the lighting and not in post. Other processing was to bring out the vibrancy of the yellow colour of the daffodil.

 

Clifton Observatory

Dating back to 1766 the Clifton Observatory, which sits on top of the Avon Gorge, gives fantastic views of the suspension bridge and the surrounding ares. The observatory was originally a windmill that was used to grind corn but was later adapted to grind snuff; the Observatory then became known as Snuff Mill.

In 1777 the mill caught fire, this was caused by the sails being left to turn during a gale and the equipment overheating. The mill was then left derelict for about 50 years until a Bristol based artist, William West, rented it for his studio in 1828. William West was responsible for transforming the building into what we see today, he installed a large telescope on top of the mill turning into an observatory. In 1829 the telescope was replaced by convex lens and sloping mirror which is known as the camera obscura; this still works today. Light travels through the lens and is reflected vertically down by the mirror onto a table which gives a true image of the surrounding area.

William west also built a cave below the observatory which leads to a viewing platform in the cliff face about 250 feet above the base of the Gorge. The cave, known as Giant’s cave was opened to the public in 1837 and is still accessible today.

Bristol Night Lights

This is a photo taken from a recent photo walk with Frui and professional photographer Jimmy Watkins, www.jimmyimage.co.uk. There was a group of six of us and we met at Zero Degrees; our first stop was at the top of a multi-story car park which gave a great view towards the city centre. After some coaching and a few shots it was on to our next location which was at the bottom of Park Street where there were plenty of images to be had if you looked for them. It was a great experience and an enjoyable evening spending time with other photographers.

 

Corfe Castle

This is a photo of Corfe Castle in Purbeck,Dorset. This shot was taken just after 0600 as I wanted to try and catch some early morning mist. My day started at 04:45 which gave me time to drive to the village and climb a near by hill for a good vantage point. A good pair of waling boots were in order as the side of the hill was very steep with loose stones on the way up amd it was at this point that I discovered how unfit I really am. After climbing what felt like a mountain and fighting through the gorse bushes, thorns and putting up with the constant bombardment of flies I finally found my spot.

Lemon

The weather has been quite rubbish outside so I decided to have a go at a still life. The lighting was a bit challenging and I spent a couple of hours playing around with the lights, diffusers and flags.

I used two Aperlite flashguns attached to manual wireless radio triggers. There was a key light places camera right and behind the setup. This light had a small Calumet flashgun softbox attached which in turn was fired through a second diffuser panel. The fill light had a grid attached placed camera right and in front of the setup to add a bit of fill, this was set at about 1.5 stops lower than the main light. Various flags were then used to help control the spread of light.

Using flashguns was useful for the tight space I was working in, the only downside is that they do not have a modelling light so a few test shots are needed to see the effect. I can reduce the power a lot more that my studio strobes though so they do have some advantages.