Posts Tagged: Water

Clifton Suspension Bridge

This is a photo of the famous Clifton Suspension Bridge, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, which sits across the Avon Gorge.The bridge spans 214 meters and is supported by two 26 meter high towers. At high tide, the bridge sits at 76 meters above the water. The bridge opened in 1864 and links Clifton to Leigh woods in North Somerset.

Pero’s Bridge

This is a shot looking towards Millennium Square from Pero’s Bridge in Bristol City Centre. The big wheel is only there for a short time and I was able to frame it between the two horns of the bridge. This was taken at pedestrian rush hour but the long exposure has rendered almost all of the people invisible.

Tranquillity

This photo was taken during sunrise at Saltford Marina, which is located between Bristol and Bath. Although it can be hard work getting up early on a Sunday morning, the results can be worth it. Add the bonus of enjoying the peace and quiet of the countryside before most other people are stirring, and you end up with a nice relaxed morning, albeit a little cold at this time of the year!

The camera was on a tripod and triggered by a wireless remote to help prevent camera shake, 1/50 sec @ f/11, ISO 100.

Liquid Colour

This photo was taken in Millennium Square in Bristol, it is a modern water feature and I likes how it reflected the colours of the surrounding lights. The camera was on a tripod and a shutter speed of 2 seconds was used to make sure the cascade of water was sufficiently blurred to produce the abstract effect.

SS Great Britain

I set the alarm for an early morning stroll in the hope of catching a sunrise. There were plenty of clouds around which made for a dramatic sky but the sun was not going to play ball. I used a tripod for stability and an ND grad to balance the exposure of the sky. This shot was taken at 17mm at f11 and using hyperfocal focusing. Using the hyperfocal point of the lens is something that I have not really used before, although I have heard of it, so I thought it was about time to give it a go. There is a formula for working out the hyperfocal distance which is…hyperfocal distance = (focal length x focal length) / (circle of confusion x f-stop)

The circle of confusion is commonly 0.02 for a full frame dSLR and 0.03 for a 1.6 corp sensor typically found on a canon crop dSLR. Anyway, I didn’t sit down and work out my hyperfocal point for this photograph; I simply downloaded a free Android app called hyperfocal pro. This took away all of the pain of the math and let me enjoy my photography! By the way, if you want to read up about the circle of confusion there is plenty about it on the internet but it is quite technical and at times, confusing!

Bristol Docks

I decided to take a walk along the docks on a nice cloudy evening. The original plan was to go the Lloyds Bank Amphitheatre to take some black and white photos. When arrived, there were too many skate boarders and other people milling around so I decided to take a walk along the opposite bank. Toward the end of the docks, near the SS Great Britain, is a fairly new development of apartments with lots of glass. This is where I ended up and I liked the cool colours in the glass contrasting with the warm colours of the setting sun reflecting off of the brooding clouds.